Music, What makes you happy?

Blues

Some people worth a listen!

Ran across some of these groups and people worth listening to.
One was a recommendation from a friend.
Sleep For Sleepers

Seasick Steve

Malice In Wonderland

Reign Project

AVONDALE

Restless Blues Band

Chad Street


Tyler Ward, Mad Dog and others Colorado players.

Yes some bands got their start in Colorado. Big Head Todd and the Monster, The Fray, One Republic, John Denver, Jesse Carmichael from Maroon 5 and Glenn Miller.
People I would like you to notice that should be added to you lists are Tyler Ward.
Graduated from University of Northern Colorado for something other than music, his album The Show is worth picking up and here is a little sample.

According to one of his videos he is a neighbor of Alex G.
Her EP Hello is worth picking up as well as her collaborations.

A group I have previously talked with Broken Tongues.

And a Congrats goes out to Mad Dog & Headman. Tonight They will be having a CD release party at the Skylite Station in Denver.

Enjoy these special Colorado People.


Jeff Daniels, Great Actor and Musician, and Colorado Music News.

Yes you heard me, he is one heck of a musician. 5 albums and counting.


Check out his channel on YouTube to see him on the road with his music.
More Music coming to Colorado!
Paramount Theater Denver
The Monkees, Aug 5
Jack Johnson, Oct 9
Joe Satriani, Sept 4
Pepsi Center Denver
RUSH, Aug 2
MUSE, Sept 17
P!nk, Oct 18
Jimmy Buffett, Oct 22
Rihanna, Nov 9
Hudson Gardens Denver
Bret Michaels, July 14
Pat Benatar, Aug 4
Foreigner, Aug 11
Styx, Aug 18
Three Dog Night, Aug 25


Music coming to Northern Colorado

At the Budweiser Events Center:
Sammy Hagar August 20
Alabama September 15
Straight No Chaser October 24

Celtic Thunder November 26
At Lincoln Center Fort Collins:
Jon Batiste and Stay Human November 1
SYBARITE5 November 15
Chick Corea & Béla Fleck January 15


Postcards from the Deathbed….talks.

Andrew Gemkow, his solo project is called, “Postcards from the Deathbed.” If you check out all the places on the web to find him you realize that one style of music is not in his vocabulary. Alternative, R&B, Rock, Folk, he has a wide variety of sounds out there, and all of it is great stuff.

His own Bio on ReverbNations says,
“Postcards from the Deathbed is the story of a man who has chosen to hide in plain sight through his use of music to make sense of the world around him and the events of his life that he cannot possibly understand. The purpose of all of this is to allow the truth to flow out though the vehicle of sound; the wording is carefully chosen to protect all who exist within the spaces of these electrons that bind us all as one existence. As the memories slip from the failing mind of an old man in his fate, these postcards may well serve to remind him of memories lost within the chaos of passing time.

The multiple sketches and refinements as they are released here are with the intent to show the evolution of understanding and acceptance of the self and the impact others have had upon his very being. These creations are a shelter within the soul from the storm that rages within the mind. This is me.”

We asked a few questions,
What or who inspired you?
Coming from a family of musicians, they have always been an exceptional source of inspiration to me. My great grandpa Rudy could play anything he heard on the concertina. My uncle Bob played drums in a wedding band. However, my greatest inspiration came from my uncle Ed. Shortly after I began learning violin, he had me stand up on a side table and play the first three songs I ever learned. When I finished, he gave me a dollar, saying, “Now you are a paid professional. It’s up to you to go as far as you want because you can be the best if you work at it.” I keep this in mind whenever I play music for someone else.

What instruments do you play and who manufactured them?
I play any stringed instrument. The physics of a vibrating string has fascinated me since my time studying with Nelle Meintz. She taught me harmonics. Later, when I learned to regulate pedal harps at Lyon and Healy, Peter Wiley introduced me to the bible of tonal physics by Hermann Helmholtz titled, ‘On the Sensation of Tone’.

The instruments I own have been carefully selected for their tonal characteristics and playability within the capabilities of my hands. Let’s just say that it’s unlikely I will ever buy an instrument off the internet.

I play a 2006 Fender Jaguar Bass that I have customized to suit my playing techniques. For example, I played about 30 different jag basses at the time before I selected the one that sounded and played best. It is strung with Thomastick flatwound strings and has a Hipshot D-tuner. I removed the pickguard and custom shaped a rosewood coverplate for the electronics pocket and added a thumb block to accommodate my right hand technique. Everything else is stock.

My guitar is a walnut 1979 Gibson SG. It was a factory “second” from the Norlin era that has had much work done to it over the years by Kagan and Gaines in Chicago and Northwest guitars. After a complete restoration in 2008, I stripped the original body finish to the natural wood and applied a hand-rubbed linseed oil finish. It has the stock “tarback” or T-top pick-up in the bridge and the stock “super humbucker” pickup in the bridge; split series/phase/parallel. Everything is stock except for a bison bone nut.

There are other instruments in the rack, but these two instruments define my sound.

What do you listen too?
My musical taste is eclectic. I listen to all forms of music. My preference is toward music that is innovative and isn’t an emulation of previous artists. “Sound-alikes” bore me. I do enjoy the recognition of an artist’s influences in their compositions; so long as their own style and personality is dominant in their sound.

I also listen intently to what other people are saying. Without this fundamental base in communication, the intent in my own compositions holds no merit.

What makes you happy? sad?

It took me a bit to think about this question. I’m pretty happy most of the time. When I’m not, it usually leads to 3am writing sessions until I can sleep again. It’s the only way that I know how to at least be completely truthful to myself. As long as I have truth, I have happiness. This doesn’t necessarily exclude sorrow, remorse or joy. Truth just happens to be the justification for experiencing all other emotions I feel.

Sadness has come from innumerable directions in my life. It is not an emotion I dwell upon for fear of becoming awash in its consumption. It’s emptiness is the very thing I avoid at all costs. It will have its place in time in its lesser forms, but holds no shelter from the night when it rolls in like a fog. I choose happiness for its limitless reward when continually shared. Sadness brought me nothing but a quick fix, hopelessness and death in all its forms.

But, if one thing makes me sad, it is those who may walk through this life having never known they are alive.

oh… and White Sox fans in a ‘shakin’ my head’ kinda way. Only because they suck so bad at being fans. That’s right, you 35th st. mutts. I said it

We would like to thank Andrew for talking with us and wish him the best of luck.
ReverbNation
Facebook
MySpace


I am Ozzy….Review.


Like I said before I found this book hard to put down. Ozzy starts from his early life and tell us the story through till a little after The Osbourne’s TV show. It a roller coaster ride of laughter and sadness in what seems to be a very honest and down to earth telling of his “Crazy Train” of life. You really get his feelings about everything that has made him the person who makes us laugh. It is worth reading even if your not big into Ozzy’s music. The insights into the music industry, traveling and other aspects of being a musician make this a very interesting look at how it all works and sometimes doesn’t work. Excellent Read, good luck on the new album Ozzy and Black Sabbath.


M.D. Friedman and Papa Juke, solo or as part of group he’s very cool.

Solo “Mad Dog” does a range of poetry/blues/and other music. As part of Papa Juke they do Blues/Juke/Jam.
So I asked him a few questions and got some information about Papa Juke to share with all of you.

How did you get started, little history bio basically?

I was 16 years old when I first heard Jack Bruce of the Cream playing “Train Time.” This was what inspired me to take up the harmonica, and I have never put it down. It is part of who I am and how I see the world.

What or who inspired you?
My early influences include John Mayall , Son Boy Williamson, Sonny Terry, Big Walter Horton, Big Mama Thorton, James Cotton, Mark Wenner , Norton Buffalo and Taj Mahal. More recently Sugar Blue, Jason Ricci , Carlos del Junco, Harper and Howard Levy never cease to amaze me.

What instruments do you play and who manufactured them?
My favorite harmonicas right now are the Marine Band Crossovers from Hohner. Generally, I prefer sealed wood comb diatonic harmonicas with good durability. The Crossover has all this and a great tuning as well. I play on Shaker harmonica mics and like the Mad Dog model for most situations. My amp is a Fender Princeton Recording Amp.

What do you listen too?
I listen to all types of music but always come back to Sugar Blue and Son Boy Williamson for inspiration. Trampled Under Foot and Treasa Levasseur are big on my current play list.

What makes you happy? sad?
Playing music, writing songs and poetry, making art and love is what makes me ecstatic. If I start to feel sad, I just play a little blues until everything is alright again.

What do you like to do in your spare time?
I like hiking in the mountains, being in nature, listening to music, sleeping in and doing nothing.

If you could do anything you wanted what would it be?
Live forever.

Anything else you think people don’t already know about you that you want to share?
I don’t hide much from anyone interested. My personal website, www.mdfriedman.com, is the best place to go to find out more about me.

Have you got another album in the works and/or music videos?
The new Papa Juke CD, Out of the Blues, is starting to get significant international airplay and national acclaim. That has taken up most of my creative energy until quite recently. I am currently working on a digital poem (like a music video for poetry) called “Never Ask a Poet Directions.” I am also learning to play Theremin for live sound sculpting with my performance poetry.

How hard has it been managing your own label and yourself?

Managing our own label is time and energy consuming and sometimes tedious, but definitely worth the expense and effort. Managing myself has always been difficult. (You know how those musicians are!)
ReverbNation, BlogSpot, Facebook, MySpace, WordPress.

Papa Juke
They have a wonderful website Papa Juke. They are also on ReverbNation, YouTube, MySpace. Scene Magazine article.

Thanks for the interview and good luck.


Dazzle Rebel……Very cool artist from the UK.

Well I met this artist through his website/blog. Not only is his music good but his commentaries are a great read.. I’m happy to say he gave me a few minutes of his time to tell us a little bit about himself and what’s going on.

What got you started?
When I was about six I wanted to learn the violin but my music teacher at school said that I didn’t have a musical bone in my body so I wasn’t even allowed to learn the recorder! Thinking music wasn’t really for me I concentrated on art until my parents split up when I was about eleven. My stepdad taught me some basic chords on guitar when I was about 12 and I started buying guitar magazines and learning tabs and learning to play along with tapes and CDs.

My Dad had already got me into Queen before he and my parents split up and my Uncle got me into Pink Floyd, Supertramp, Guns N’ Roses and Def Leppard. In the UK while the grunge scene was big it was soon surpassed by Brit Pop and Indie bands in about 1994. Bands like Oasis, Wildhearts, Terrorvision and Mansun became the everyday staples of my musical diet. That did it for me really, music was my life.

What instruments you play and what company manufactured them?
Although I started off playing guitar I changed to bass when I was about twenty. I’ve got a brilliant Tokai Thunderbird bass which has the best sustain and low-end growl out of all my bass guitars – of which I have another two Thunderbirds by Epiphone and a small assortment of other brands. My guitars of choice are Gordon Smiths, I have three; a Gypsy and a GS1 and a GS2 delux. They make their own pickups and are amazing instruments. My favourite guitar is my jumbo Epiphone acoustic which my wife bought me a few years ago. You’ll be hearing more of that next year because I’ve got some accoustic recordings planned.

How has it been running your own management?

It’s been great. I’ve spent years being managed to varying degrees of success. Some managers though just wanted to join in the party, which when they have the cash to flaunt on booze and drugs can be lethal but I don’t think it makes for a good manager. Keeping your artists happy is one thing but I believe there’s a reason they call them a manager; they should manage the artists and keep them in line. I’m under no illusions though, I don’t really know the first thing about management but I’m not trying to get anything other than personal enjoyment out of this whole project anyway.

When is the album going to be released?
If the Christmas festivities don’t get too much in the way I am hoping to get my debut EP “Skint and Dangerous” out on 24th December. It’s only a demo and will be available for free streaming and download via www.reverbnation.com/dazzlerebel. You can hear one of the tracks “Back Home and Sober” here now http://soundcloud.com/dazzlerebel. I have no immediate plans for an album yet but will continue to release tracks for free download throughout next year. Once I’ve improved my mixing technique I’ll look at cutting a proper album on disc and releasing it properly.
Please check out his other sites at Youtube, MySpace, and Facebook.

Thanks to Dazzle Rebel for talking with us.


Halloween…….Mummies….!

Well if you haven’t seen these guys your really missing something.
This group is called “Here Comes the Mummies.” Rumor has it member of the band are Grammy winners who are keeping their identity secret by wrapping themselves in bandages. There music is a mix of different things and the lyrics are raunchy to risky. The most recent album is entitled “Bed, Bath and Behind.”
One of my favorites is a tune called “Pants.” Although one of their songs was in the movie “Fired Up” you may recognize “Dirty Minds.” Check them out and see what you think.


Yakety……What?

Well if you look up the definition it means idol chatter or talk but if you look up music you find, Boots Randolph, Chet Atkins, Sha Na Na or Bennie Hill. Now I realize that some of you may not know any of these people, so I say you are missing out.
Boots Randolph was a saxophonist, mainly the tenor sax. Born in 1927 and died in 2007. There is a wonder podcast on NPR about Boots and his life. But if you haven’t heard him play check out this video of him doing Yakety Sax, he knows how to make that sax talk.
Chet Atkins, also known as Mister Guitar, has a way of making his instrument of choice talk as well with his video of Yakety Axe. He was born in 1924 and died in 2001. He was friends with Boots and Yakety Axe was his version of Randolph’s Yakety Sax.
What came later in the Yakety course was a song made famous by the Coasters in 1958, later performed by Sha Na Na in this video clip. This group is still at large and you can see their tour dates at the Official Sha Na Na website.
Where will the next Yakety music come from who knows.